2021 Boston Marathon

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2021 Boston Marathon
Benson Kipruto.jpg Diana Kipyokei crop.jpg
VenueBoston, Massachusetts, United States
DateOctober 11, 2021
Champions
MenBenson Kipruto (2:09:51)
WomenDiana Kipyokei (2:24:45)
Wheelchair menMarcel Hug (1:18:11)
Wheelchair womenManuela Schär (1:35:21)
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The 2021 Boston Marathon was the 124th running of the annual marathon race held in Boston, Massachusetts.[a][3] It took place on October 11, 2021.[4]

The elite men's marathon was won by Benson Kipruto and the elite women's marathon by Diana Kipyokei, both of Kenya, in 2:09:51 and 2:24:45, respectively. The men's wheelchair race was won by Marcel Hug and the women's wheelchair race by Manuela Schär, both of Switzerland, in 1:18:11 and 1:35:21, respectively.[5][6]

COVID-19 impact and protocols[edit]

After the planned 2020 edition of the race was canceled,[a] due to the COVID-19 pandemic, organizers moved the 2021 race from its traditional Patriots' Day date in April to Columbus Day / Indigenous Peoples' Day in October.[7][8] It was the first time that the Boston Marathon was run in the fall.[9] The Boston event was one day after the 2021 Chicago Marathon, and multiple wheelchair racers chose to compete in both events.[10]

Organizers also limited the field to 20,000 runners.[11] Race entrants were required to provide proof of COVID vaccination or take an on-site COVID test yielding a negative result before the race.[12] Participants were issued a bracelet to be worn through completion of the race, as proof of compliance.[12] Runners were required to comply with local face masks requirements, and while using race transportation, but masks were not required during the marathon.[13]

Course[edit]

The marathon distance is officially 42.195 kilometres (26.219 mi), as sanctioned by the International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF), now known as World Athletics.[14] The start is in the town of Hopkinton, and the first 6 miles (9.7 km) are downhill through Ashland and into the city of Framingham.[15] Leaving Framingham, the runners enter the town of Natick, before passing through the "Scream Tunnel" at mile 12. This area is lined by young women from the nearby Wellesley College who request kisses from runners, a tradition that has been in place for more than 100 years.[16] At mile 15, there is a large downhill section, followed by a 0.75-mile (1.21 km) climb at mile 16 crossing the Yankee Division Highway. The runners take a right turn onto Commonwealth Avenue in Newton before starting the first of the four Newton Hills.[15]

Course map
Finish line on Boylston Street in 2012

The first hill is a steep 1,200-yard (1,100 m) climb, the second about 0.25 miles (0.40 km), the third a steep 800 yards (730 m) before the runners start the infamous "Heartbreak Hill" at just after mile 20.[15][17] At half a mile long and with a 3.3% percent incline, it is not especially difficult, but due to the hill being 20 miles (32 km) into the race, it is still feared as the runners' legs are usually tired at this point.[15][18] The course is mostly downhill to the end, and passes through Boston College before entering Cleveland Circle and Kenmore Square, where there are many spectators.[15] The final mile has a slight incline, before it flattens off to finish on Boylston Street.[15][18]

Race summary[edit]

For the first time in Boston Marathon history, the elite men's race was started separately from the mass participation event.[19] The event was won by Kenyan Benson Kipruto.[20] CJ Albertson led the race in the early stages, before fading away;[21] at the halfway point of the race, Albertson was over two minutes ahead of everyone else.[19] Kipruto pulled away from the leading pack with 3 miles (4.8 km) to go in the race, on Beacon Street,[20] and won by 49 seconds. Ethiopians Lemi Berhanu and Jemal Yimer finished second and third respectively.[21] Colin Bennie was the top finishing American, in seventh place, and Albertson finished tenth overall.[19]

The elite women's race was won by Kenyan Diana Kipyokei; it was the eighth time since 2000 that Kenyans had won both elite events.[20] Kipyokei took the lead 19 miles (31 km) into the race.[21] Fellow Kenyans Edna Kiplagat and Mary Ngugi finished second and third respectively.[21] At the halfway point, there were 14 runners in the lead group, and eight of those ran negative splits.[22] Nell Rojas was the best finishing American; she was sixth overall.[22] 2018 winner Desiree Linden was ill during the race.[22] Shalane Flanagan finished in a time of 2:40:34 as part of an attempt to finish the five active World Marathon Majors in 2021 in 42 days. The previous day in Chicago, she had finished in 2:46:39, and she had previously finished in 2:38:32 at Berlin and 2:35:04 at London.[23]

The men's wheelchair race was won by Swiss athlete Marcel Hug. He was on a course record time, which would have earned him $50,000, until he took a wrong turn. Hug finished in a time of 01:18:11, seven seconds slower than the course record,[20][24] which he had set in 2017.[25] American Daniel Romanchuk finished second, seven minutes and 35 seconds behind Hug, and Ernst van Dyk was third overall.[24]

The women's wheelchair race was won by Manuela Schär.[20] Schär won the event by almost 15 minutes, and it was her third Boston Marathon victory.[25] Schär took the lead early on, and by half distance, she was five minutes ahead of Tatyana McFadden, her nearest competitor. McFadden finished second overall.[25]

Results[edit]

Men[edit]

Elite men's top 10 finishers
Place Athlete Nationality Time
1st place, gold medalist(s) Benson Kipruto  Kenya 2:09:51
2nd place, silver medalist(s) Lemi Berhanu  Ethiopia 2:10:37
3rd place, bronze medalist(s) Jemal Yimer  Ethiopia 2:10:38
4 Tsedat Ayana  Ethiopia 2:10:47
5 Leonard Barsoton  Kenya 2:11:11
6 Bayelign Teshager  Ethiopia 2:11:16
7 Colin Bennie  United States 2:11:26
8 Dejene Debela  Ethiopia 2:11:38
9 Wilson Chebet  Kenya 2:11:40
10 CJ Albertson  United States 2:11:44

Source: [26]

Women[edit]

Elite women's top 10 finishers
Place Athlete Nationality Time
1st place, gold medalist(s) Diana Kipyokei  Kenya 2:24:45
2nd place, silver medalist(s) Edna Kiplagat  Kenya 2:25:09
3rd place, bronze medalist(s) Mary Ngugi  Kenya 2:25:20
4 Monicah Ngige  Kenya 2:25:32
5 Netsanet Gudeta  Ethiopia 2:26:09
6 Nell Rojas  United States 2:27:12
7 Workenesh Edesa  Ethiopia 2:27:38
8 Atsede Baysa  Ethiopia 2:28:04
9 Biruktayit Eshetu  Ethiopia 2:29:05
10 Tigist Abayechew  Kenya 2:29:06

Source: [26]

Wheelchair men[edit]

Wheelchair men's top 10 finishers
Place Athlete Nationality Time
1st place, gold medalist(s) Marcel Hug   Switzerland 1:18:11
2nd place, silver medalist(s) Daniel Romanchuk  United States 1:25:46
3rd place, bronze medalist(s) Ernst van Dyk  South Africa 1:28:43
4 Aaron Pike  United States 1:28:55
5 Josh Cassidy  Canada 1:28:56
6 Johnboy Smith  United Kingdom 1:31:43
7 Kota Hokinoue  Japan 1:34:16
8 Hermin Garic  United States 1:34:23
9 Sho Watanabe  Japan 1:35:06
10 Hiroki Nishida  Japan 1:35:11

Source:[26]

Wheelchair women[edit]

Wheelchair women's top 10 finishers
Place Athlete Nationality Time
1st place, gold medalist(s) Manuela Schär   Switzerland 1:35:21
2nd place, silver medalist(s) Tatyana McFadden  United States 1:50:20
3rd place, bronze medalist(s) Yen Hoang  United States 1:51:24
4 Vanessa De Souza  Brazil 1:53:23
5 Shelly Woods  United Kingdom 1:54:33
6 Jenna Fesemyer  United States 1:59:51
7 Margriet van den Broek  Netherlands 2:04:28
8 Michelle Wheeler  United States 2:07:10
9 Arielle Rausin  United States 2:07:32
10 Eva Houston  United States 2:41:52

Source:[26]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b Following the cancellation of the 2020 edition, organizers later staged a "virtual alternative" in September 2020 as the 124th running of the marathon.[1][2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "124th Boston Marathon to be Held Virtually" (Press release). Boston Athletic Association. May 28, 2020. Retrieved October 9, 2021.
  2. ^ "124th Boston Marathon Virtual Experience Features More Than 15,900 Finishers" (Press release). Boston Athletic Association. September 25, 2020. Retrieved October 9, 2021.
  3. ^ "125th Boston Marathon Qualifier Acceptances Announced" (Press release). Boston Athletic Association. May 4, 2021. Archived from the original on October 11, 2021. Retrieved October 9, 2021.
  4. ^ "Fall 2021 Boston Marathon Date Selected" (Press release). Boston Athletic Association. January 26, 2021. Archived from the original on May 21, 2021. Retrieved October 9, 2021.
  5. ^ "Boston Athletic Association".
  6. ^ "Boston Athletic Association".
  7. ^ Sobey, Rick (January 26, 2021). "Boston Marathon set for Oct. 11 — if road races are allowed in Massachusetts coronavirus reopening plan". Boston Herald. Archived from the original on May 6, 2021. Retrieved January 27, 2021.
  8. ^ "An update from the B.A.A. on Indigenous Peoples' Day" (Press release). Boston Athletic Association. August 27, 2021. Archived from the original on October 12, 2021. Retrieved October 9, 2021.
  9. ^ "Boston Marathon: First time in the fall, and no spectator kissing allowed". The Mercury News. Associated Press. October 11, 2021. Archived from the original on October 11, 2021. Retrieved October 13, 2021.
  10. ^ Berg, Aimee (October 10, 2021). "5 major marathons. In 42 days. 2 back-to-back. How top wheelchair racers are doing it". NPR. Archived from the original on October 13, 2021. Retrieved October 13, 2021.
  11. ^ Cain, Jonathan (March 15, 2021). "This Year's Boston Marathon, Rescheduled For October, Will Be Capped At 20,000 Runners". WBUR-FM. Retrieved April 9, 2021.
  12. ^ a b "B.A.A. Announces Participant Health & Safety Policies for 125th Boston Marathon" (Press release). Boston Athletic Association. September 2, 2021. Archived from the original on October 12, 2021. Retrieved October 9, 2021.
  13. ^ "Boston Marathon Participants Will Have To Provide Proof Of Vaccination Or Negative COVID Test, B.A.A. Announces". WBZ-TV. September 2, 2021. Archived from the original on September 3, 2021. Retrieved October 9, 2021.
  14. ^ "IAAF Competition Rules for Road Races". International Association of Athletics Federations. 2009. Archived from the original on September 23, 2015. Retrieved April 5, 2021.
  15. ^ a b c d e f Mayer Irvine, Heather (March 19, 2020). "Here's How to Run Your Best Boston Marathon". Runner's World. Archived from the original on October 8, 2021. Retrieved April 5, 2021.
  16. ^ Turchi, Megan (April 12, 2018). "Kissing, posters, and so much screeching: A history of the Wellesley College 'Scream Tunnel'". Boston.com. Archived from the original on October 8, 2021. Retrieved April 5, 2021.
  17. ^ Dwyer, Dialynn (April 3, 2019). "How Heartbreak Hill got its name". Boston.com. Retrieved April 5, 2021.
  18. ^ a b "Boston Marathon: Mile-By-Mile Runners' Guide". WBZ-TV. April 1, 2019. Archived from the original on April 11, 2021. Retrieved April 5, 2021.
  19. ^ a b c Douglas, Scott (October 11, 2021). "Benson Kipruto Wins the 2021 Boston Marathon Men's Race". Runner's World. Archived from the original on October 11, 2021. Retrieved October 12, 2021.
  20. ^ a b c d e "Marcel Hug loses out on $50,000 at Boston Marathon after wrong turn". The Guardian. Associated Press. October 11, 2021. Archived from the original on October 12, 2021. Retrieved October 12, 2021.
  21. ^ a b c d "Boston Marathon: Kipruto and Kipyogei land Kenyan double". BBC Sport. October 11, 2021. Archived from the original on October 12, 2021. Retrieved October 12, 2021.
  22. ^ a b c Lorge Butler, Sarah (October 11, 2021). "Diana Kipyokei Wins the 2021 Boston Marathon Women's Race". Runner's World. Archived from the original on October 11, 2021. Retrieved October 12, 2021.
  23. ^ McInerney, Katie (October 12, 2021). "Shalane Flanagan ran the Boston Marathon a day after running Chicago — and she's not done yet". The Boston Globe. Retrieved October 14, 2021.
  24. ^ a b Mather, Victor (October 11, 2021). "A missed turn may have cost Marcel Hug $50,000 in the men's wheelchair race". The New York Times. Archived from the original on October 12, 2021. Retrieved October 12, 2021.
  25. ^ a b c Dutch, Taylor (October 11, 2021). "Marcel Hug, Manuela Schär Win the 2021 Boston Marathon Wheelchair Titles". Runner's World. Archived from the original on October 11, 2021. Retrieved October 12, 2021.
  26. ^ a b c d Results

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]