List of state and county courthouses in Pennsylvania

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This is a list of former and current non-federal courthouses in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. Each of the 67 counties in the Commonwealth has a city designated as the county seat where the county government resides, including a county courthouse for the court of general jurisdiction, the Court of Common Pleas. Other courthouses are used by the three state-wide appellate courts (the Supreme Court, the Superior Court, and the Commonwealth Court), or minor courts such as the municipal courts of Philadelphia and Pittsburgh, or magisterial district courts. As noted below, some courthouses are listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

17th-19th centuries[edit]

After William Penn landed in the new Province of Pennsylvania in 1682, he set up a general-purpose Provincial Court. The state supreme court traces its origin to that institution. The oldest existing building in the Commonwealth that was used for the judiciary is the Chester County Courthouse of 1724, used for trials until 1967. The Franklin County courthouse was destroyed by Confederate troops in 1864 during the American Civil War.

State and county courthouses[edit]

Courthouse Image County Location Built Architect[1] Style Notes Additional References
Old Adams County Courthouse Old Adams County Courthouse, Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, 1804.jpg Adams Gettysburg
39°49′51″N 77°13′51″W / 39.83093°N 77.23087°W / 39.83093; -77.23087 (Old Adams County Courthouse)
1804 unknown Federal Pennsylvania Historical Marker Text: First courthouse for Adams County stood in old Center Square from 1804 to 1859. The land for the Square was given by James Gettys.
Adams County Courthouse Adams PA Courthouse 2.JPG Adams Gettysburg
39°49′46″N 77°13′57″W / 39.829444°N 77.2325°W / 39.829444; -77.2325 (Adams County Courthouse)
1858 Stephen Decatur Button Italianate NRHP-listed (refnum 74001728). John R. Turner of Carlisle constructed the building. The building is two stories high, three bays wide, six bays deep and constructed of red brick, which was originally painted gray. Rear wings were added in 1895. A large clock tower reaches about 70 feet (21 m) above ground level. During the Battle of Gettysburg the building served as both a command post and as a hospital, for both Union and Confederate armies. [2][3]
Old Allegheny County Courthouses Old Pittsbugh Court House and Market, Taken Down 1852.jpg Courthouse Pittsburgh 1857.jpg Allegheny Pittsburgh 1794, 1841 Greek Revival (1841) Pittsburgh's original courthouse, first occupied in 1794, was a wooden structure located on one side of Market Square. The Pennsylvania Supreme Court and from December 7, 1818, until 1841 the federal Western District of Pennsylvania also held court sessions at Market Square. Land for a new courthouse was purchased in April 1834. Construction took place between 1836 and 1840. This court house was built with polished gray sandstone, quarried at Coal Hill (present-day Mount Washington), opposite Water Street along the Monongahela River. The Greek Revival design included a domed cupola housing a rotunda 60 feet (18 m) in diameter and 80 feet (24 m) high. The building was completed in 1841. The building's second floor again served as the headquarters for both the Commonwealth Supreme Court Pittsburgh region and the Federal Western District, serving the latter until a new U.S. Customs House/Post Office opened on Fifth and Smithfield in 1853. Due to corrosion caused by coal smoke, the building deteriorated: the dressed surface of the facade dropped off, some of the cornices near the roof began to fall, and the building had a scaly appearance. On May 7, 1882, a fire broke out and ruined the building. Subsequently, it was demolished. The third, and present, courthouse was erected on the same spot.
Allegheny County Courthouse AlleghenyCountyCourthouse.jpg Allegheny Pittsburgh
40°26′18″N 79°59′46″W / 40.4384°N 79.9961°W / 40.4384; -79.9961 (Allegheny County Courthouse and Jail)
1888 Henry Hobson Richardson Romanesque Revival NRHP-listed (refnum 73001586 as Allegheny County Courthouse and Jail). It is part of a complex (along with the old Allegheny County Jail). The design of the Allegheny County Courthouse has influenced buildings in many cities across America, such as Minneapolis City Hall, Altgeld Hall on the campus of the University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign, and James W. McLaughlin's Wayne County Courthouse in Richmond, Indiana. [4][5]
Armstrong County Courthouse Kittanning Courthouse.jpg Armstrong Kittanning
40°48′59″N 79°31′00″W / 40.816389°N 79.516667°W / 40.816389; -79.516667 (Armstrong County Courthouse and Jail)
1860 Hulings and Dickey Greek Revival NRHP-listed (refnum 81000526). The courthouse was built between 1858 and 1860, and is a two-story, brick and stone building measuring 105 feet by 65 feet. It has a hipped roof topped by an octagonal cupola and bell. It features a portico with four Corinthian order columns in Greek Revival style. [6][7]
Old Beaver County Courthouse 1910 Beaver County Pennsylvania Courthouse.jpg Beaver Beaver 1875 Thomas Boyd Second Empire Courthouse is illustrated in a 1910 postcard. It was rebuilt in 1933 after a fire in a then-contemporary Streamline Moderne style.
Beaver County Courthouse Beaver County Courthouse, Pennsylvania.jpg Beaver Beaver
40°41′41″N 80°18′31″W / 40.6947°N 80.3086°W / 40.6947; -80.3086 (Beaver County Courthouse)
2002 Postmodern [8][9]
Bedford County Courthouse Bedford County Courthouse Pennsylvania.jpg Bedford Bedford 1828 Jason Filler Federal [10][11]
Old Berks County Courthouse Z BerksCountyCourtHouse 1854 web 10500.1548177669.1280.1280.jpg Berks Reading 1840 Classical Revival Old Courthouse as it appeared in 1854 is shown.
Berks County Courthouse Reading Pennsylvania.jpg Berks Reading
40°20′12″N 75°55′31″W / 40.336551°N 75.925381°W / 40.336551; -75.925381 (Berks County Courthouse)
1932 Miles Boyer Dechant Art Deco [12][13]
Blair County Courthouse Blair County Courthouse Apr 10.JPG Blair Hollidaysburg
40°25′49″N 78°23′33″W / 40.430278°N 78.3925°W / 40.430278; -78.3925 (Blair County Courthouse)
1877 David S. Glendall Gothic Revival NRHP-listed (refnum 76001606). It was built in 1875–1876, and is a "T" shaped stone building. The entrance is flanked by two square, three-story towers with truncated pyramidal roofs. The building generally features elaborate stonework and a five-story clock tower topped by a tall stone spire. [14][15]
Bradford County Courthouse Bradford County Courthouse Nov 09.jpg Bradford Towanda
41°45′59″N 76°26′21″W / 41.766389°N 76.439167°W / 41.766389; -76.439167 (Bradford County Courthouse)
1848 Israel Lehman, Theodore Schmitt Renaissance Revival NRHP-listed (refnum 86003573). It was built between 1896 and 1898, and is a four-story, cruciform shaped building. It has rusticated sandstone exterior walls and a 50-foot diameter octagonal dome atop the roof. It features an entrance portico supported by Tuscan order columns. [16][17]
Old Bucks County Courthouse Old Bucks County, Pennsylvania, Courthouse 1906.jpg Bucks Doylestown 1878 Addison Hutton Romanesque Revival
Bucks County Courthouse Bucks Courthouse.JPG Bucks Doylestown 1962 Carroll, Grisdale & Van Alen, and Fred F. Martin Associates Modern [18][19]
Old Butler County Courthouse Old Butler County, Pennsylvania, Courthouse.jpg Butler Butler 1807 unknown Classical Revival
Butler County Courthouse Butler County Courthouse, Butler.jpg Butler Butler
40°51′30″N 79°53′46″W / 40.858333°N 79.896111°W / 40.858333; -79.896111 (Butler County Courthouse)
1885 James P. Bailey High Victorian Gothic NRHP-listed (refnum 77001132). It was built in 1885, and is a three-story, brick and sandstone building. It features a large central, four-faced clock tower with two double pyramid shaped roofs. It is the tallest structure in downtown Butler. The first and second floors are designed to be gothic and art deco with several crown moldings, domed ceilings, marble floors and walls, and woodwork. [20][21]
Cambria County Courthouse Cambria County Courthouse - Ebensburg, PA.jpg Cambria Ebensburg
40°29′01″N 78°43′29″W / 40.483611°N 78.724722°W / 40.483611; -78.724722 (Cambria County Courthouse)
1882 M.E. Beebe Second Empire NRHP-listed (refnum 80003449). It was built in 1880–1881, and is a 3+12-story, brick building. It features a mansard roof. Henry Shenk constructed it at a cost of $109,962. The building is a parallelogram with a 120 ft. of frontage on Center St. with a depth of 80 ft. The height to the eaves of the roof is 48 ft. The mansard slate roof has porthole dormers and elaborate chimneys and a decorative bracketed cornice. The central pavilion has flanking pilasters supporting a classic portico. Courtroom 1 was added in 1923. It is one of the largest courtrooms in the United States, with 500 seats. [22][23]
Cameron County Courthouse Cameron County Courthouse, Emporium, PA.jpg Cameron Emporium 1890 A.S. Wagner Romanesque Revival [24][25]
Carbon County Courthouse Carbon County, Pennsylvania, Courthouse, ca. 1920.jpg Carbon Jim Thorpe
40°51′49″N 75°44′17″W / 40.8637°N 75.7381°W / 40.8637; -75.7381 (Carbon County Courthouse)
1893 L.S. Jacoby Romanesque Revival [26][27]
Centre County Courthouse Centre County Courthouse Apr 09.jpg Centre Bellefonte
40°54′44″N 77°46′37″W / 40.912222°N 77.776944°W / 40.912222; -77.776944 (Centre County Courthouse)
1805 Ezra Ale Greek Revival NRHP-listed (refnum 76001618). The original section was built in 1805. It is a rectangular brick building on a stone foundation, measuring 135 feet long by 60 feet wide. The building is faced in stucco and has a gable roof topped by a cupola. It features an entry porch with eight 26 foot high smooth faced columns with Ionic order capitals. The porch was added in 1835. [28][29]
Old Chester County Courthouse 1724 Chester Courhouse.JPG Chester Chester
39°50′52″N 75°21′36″W / 39.8478°N 75.3599°W / 39.8478; -75.3599 (1724 Chester Courthouse)
1724 unknown German Colonial NRHP-listed (refnum 71000702). Chester, Pennsylvania is the former county seat for Chester County, Pennsylvania, one of the three counties in the Province of Pennsylvania laid out by William Penn. It is the oldest courthouse still standing in the United States. The courthouse is 2+12 stories high with no basement and 2 foot thick walls. The south and east facades of the building are hewn stone with the other two built of rubble stone. The Quaker influence on the building can be seen in the two front doors, one for men and the other for women. The interior measures 31 by 36 feet. The first level has a stone floor court room divided by a low wooden railing that was designed to separate the judges and lawyers from court observers. There are no fireplaces on the first floor but both the jury room and petit jury room on the second floor have fireplaces. The cupola on the courthouse contained a bell that was cast in London and added in 1729. The court room was the oldest active court in use in the United States until 1967.
Chester County Courthouse Chester County Courthouse PA 2015.jpg Chester West Chester
39°57′35″N 75°36′18″W / 39.959861°N 75.605°W / 39.959861; -75.605 (1724 Chester County Courthouse)
1846 Thomas U. Walter Greek Revival NRHP-listed (refnum 72001109). It was built in 1846 at a cost of $55,346. Walter also designed the dome of the United States Capitol. An addition, designed by T. Roney Williamson and constructed from Indiana Limestone, was added in 1893. Another addition was added in 1966. Ground was broken in early 1846, and the cornerstone was placed on 4 July; the courthouse was completed in late 1847, with the total cost of the project reaching $55,345.98. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places on June 5, 1972, and located in the West Chester Downtown Historic District. [30][31]
Old Clarion County Courthouse Clarion County, Pennsylvania, Courthouse 1865.jpg Clarion Clarion ca. 1865 Italianate
Clarion County Courthouse Clarion County Pennsylvania Courthouse.jpg Clarion Clarion
41°12′55″N 79°23′09″W / 41.215278°N 79.385833°W / 41.215278; -79.385833 (Clarion County Courthouse and Jail)
1885 E.M. Butz Queen Anne NRHP-listed (refnum 79002208). The courthouse was built between 1883 and 1885, and is a 3+12-story, brick Victorian structure with Classical details measuring 78 feet, 8 inches, wide and 134 feet deep. It has a 213-foot-tall, 25-feet-square, clock tower. Two earlier courthouses were built on the site: the first was completed in 1843, the second in 1863. Both were built of brick and both were destroyed by fire. The second courthouse burned down on September 12, 1882. The architect was E.M. Butz of Allegheny, Pennsylvania (now part of Pittsburgh) who designed the building in the Queen Anne style and the supervising architect was D. English of Brockville. Henry Warner of Allegheny painted the frescos. The floor tiling was laid by the Star Encaustic Tile Company of Pittsburgh and the Howard Clock Company of New York supplied the 9-foot diameter clock dial and the 1313 pound bell. A galvanized iron sculpture called the "Lady of Justice", standing 9 feet 11 inches tall on top of the clock tower, is of unknown origin. The "Lady of Justice" was restored in 1981. About 25 bullet holes were in the statue and her left arm was missing. [32][33]
Clearfield County Courthouse Clearfield County Courthouse Apr 10.JPG Clearfield Clearfield
41°01′20″N 78°26′16″W / 41.022222°N 78.437778°W / 41.022222; -78.437778 (Clearfield County Courthouse)
1860 Cleaveland and Bachus Second Empire NRHP-listed (refnum 79002210). It is a 2+12-story brick structure constructed in 1860. An addition was completed in 1884. It features a square brick clock tower with a bell shaped roof. [34][35]
Clinton County Courthouse Clinton County Pennsylvania Courthouse 2 crop.jpg Clinton Lock Haven 1867 Samuel Sloan, Addison Hutton Romanesque Revival [36][37]
Columbia County Courthouse Columbia County, Pennsylvania court house.JPG Columbia Bloomsburg
41°00′12″N 76°27′25″W / 41.003230°N 76.457030°W / 41.003230; -76.457030 (Columbia County Courthouse)
1890 A.S. Wagner Romanesque Revival [38][39]
Old Crawford County Courthouse Crawford County Pennsylvania Courthouse.jpg Crawford Meadville 1870 Classical Revival Pennsylvania Historical Marker Text: At the South Ward schools, Elias Allen tried unsuccessfully to enroll his two children. He appealed to the Crawford County Court of Common Pleas, and Judge Pearson Church declared unconstitutional the 1854 state law mandating separate schools for Negro children. This law was amended, effective July 4, 1881, to prohibit such segregation.
Crawford County Judicial Center Photo found at this reference: [40] Crawford Meadville
41°38′19″N 80°08′58″W / 41.638670°N 80.149520°W / 41.638670; -80.149520 (Crawford County Courthouse)
2017 Postmodern [41][42]
Old Cumberland County Courthouse Carlisle, Pennsylvania (5656229890).jpg Cumberland Carlisle 1846 Daniel E. Witt, Samuel Bryan, Jr. Classical Revival On July 1, 1863, the Confederate Army, under the command of General J.E.B. Stuart, demanded that the Union surrender and General William Smith replied, "shell and be damned." The Confederates then shelled the town and one of the columns at the courthouse bears the mark of the artillery barrage. Following the attack, General Robert E. Lee ordered the Confederate unit to the Battle of Gettysburg. The courthouse was also critical for the Underground Railroad in Pennsylvania. One runaway slave case at the courthouse resulted in the largest fine assessed from a federal fugitive slave system. Another case fueled a riot in 1847 that resulted in the death of a southern slave-holder, the first death of a slave-holder North of the Mason-Dixon Line.[43]
Cumberland County Courthouse Carlisle, Pennsylvania (5656226200).jpg Cumberland Carlisle 1961 Lawrie and Green Modern [44][45]
Old Dauphin County Courthouses Z Harrisburg CourtHouse 1858 web 42218.1548181137.1280.1280.jpg Dauphin Harrisburg
40°15′38″N 76°52′53″W / 40.2605°N 76.8813°W / 40.2605; -76.8813 (Old Dauphin County Courthouses)
1799, 1860 unknown Pennsylvania Historical Marker Text: Two Dauphin County Courthouses occupied this site. The first, built 1792–99, served as the State House for the Pennsylvania Legislature from 1812 to 1821. It was removed in 1860. The second stood here from 1860 to 1948. (The 1792 courthouse in the illustration is shown in 1858.)
Dauphin County Courthouse Dauphin County Courthouse.jpg Dauphin Harrisburg
40°15′30″N 76°52′57″W / 40.258333°N 76.8825°W / 40.258333; -76.8825 (Dauphin County Courthouse)
1942 Lawrie and Green Art Deco NRHP-listed (refnum 93000723). The current courthouse was designed in 1940. The interior artwork was done by sculptor C. Paul Jennewein. [46][47]
Pennsylvania Judicial Center Pennsylvania Judicial Center.jpg Dauphin Harrisburg
40°15′54″N 76°52′56″W / 40.265°N 76.882222°W / 40.265; -76.882222 (Pennsylvania State Capitol Complex)
2010 New Classical This contains the Commonwealth Court's sole courtroom in the state.
Pennsylvania State Capitol Building Sunset Capitol of Harrisburg.jpgLAW mural photograph.jpg Dauphin Harrisburg
40°15′52″N 76°53′01″W / 40.264441°N 76.883624°W / 40.264441; -76.883624 (Pennsylvania State Capitol)
1906 Joseph Miller Huston Beaux Arts The Supreme Court, and the Superior Court meet at different times of the year in courtrooms in Harrisburg, Philadelphia, and Pittsburgh. The Superior Court also occasionally holds sessions in other parts of the state. The Supreme and Superior Court Chamber in the capitol building is used by both courts and was designed using ancient Greek and Roman themes. It is located on the fourth floor of the capitol, on the east side of the rotunda. A cycle of 16 panels, painted between 1917 and 1927, begins and ends with Divine Law as its keystone, over the main entrance. Around the room clockwise the murals represent the Law of Nature; Greek, Hebrew, and Christian Revealed Law; Roman Law of Reason; English Common Law; William Penn as Law-Giver; State, National, and International law, and finally, the Spirit of Divine Law. A stained-glass dome, designed by Pennsylvania native Alfred Godwin, is in the center of the ceiling.
Old Delaware County Courthouse Media Pa. Courthouse c.1906 bwpc.jpg Delaware Media 1851 Samuel Sloan Classical Revival
Delaware County Courthouse Media PA Delco Courthouse South.JPG Delaware Media 1913 Classical Revival [48][49]
Elk County Courthouse Elk County Courthouse.jpg Elk Ridgway 1879 J.H. Marston Second Empire The courthouse is red brick with sandstone. The tower originally supported a statue of Justice, which was destroyed by lightning in the 1930s. The interior was modernized in about 1969. [50][51]
Erie County Courthouse ErieCtyCourthouse EriePA.JPG Erie Erie
42°07′45″N 80°05′17″W / 42.129280°N 80.087980°W / 42.129280; -80.087980 (Erie County Courthouse)
1855 Thomas Ustick Walter Classical Revival [52][53]
Fayette County Courthouse Fayette County Courthouse, Uniontown.jpg Fayette Uniontown 1890 E.M. Butz, William Kaufman Romanesque Revival [54][55]
Forest County Courthouse Forest County Courthouse, Tionesta, from north.jpg Forest Tionesta 1870 Keene Vaughn Plain A simple brick building with stone accents. It has a Palladian window above the entrance, and a simulated pediment with a small lunette. The interior has been modernized.[56] [57][58]
Old Franklin County Courthouse Old Franklin County Courthouse, Chambersburg, Pennsylvania, after destruction by Confederate troops on July 30, 1864.jpg Franklin Chambersburg
41°12′55″N 79°23′09″W / 41.215278°N 79.385833°W / 41.215278; -79.385833 (Franklin County Courthouse)
1842 Greek Revival Image shows courthouse after the Raid on Chambersburg and destruction by Confederate troops on July 30, 1864. It was the second county courthouse on the site.
Franklin County Courthouse Memorial Square Chambersburg.jpg Franklin Chambersburg
41°12′55″N 79°23′09″W / 41.215278°N 79.385833°W / 41.215278; -79.385833 (Franklin County Courthouse)
1865 S. Hutton Greek Revival NRHP-listed (refnum 74001784). The building was designed and built around the remaining walls and columns left from the courthouse destroyed in 1864. It stands two and half stories high, and is built of brick. There are fifty-four windows, twenty-two on each side and five each front and back. It features a domed clock cupola with a statue of Benjamin Franklin on top. There are also six symmetrically placed chimneys on the roof. [59][60]
Fulton County Courthouse Courthouse-600px.jpg Fulton McConnellsburg 1851 Jacob Stoner Greek Revival [61][62]
Grant Building Grant Building Pittsburgh.jpg Allegheny Pittsburgh
40°26′15″N 79°59′51″W / 40.4375°N 79.9975°W / 40.4375; -79.9975 (Grant Building)
1929 Henry Hornbostel Art Deco Location for the Pittsburgh sessions of the Superior Court.
Greene County Courthouse Greene County Courthouse, Waynesburg.jpg Greene Waynesburg 1852 Samuel and John Bryan Classical Revival [63][64]
Huntingdon County Courthouse Huntingdon County, Pennsylvania, Courthouse 1905.jpg Huntingdon Huntingdon 1883 M.E. Beebe Second Empire [65][66]
Old Indiana County Courthouse Old Indiana County Courthouse.jpg Indiana Indiana
40°37′23″N 79°09′07″W / 40.623056°N 79.151944°W / 40.623056; -79.151944 (Old Indiana County Courthouse)
1869 James W. Drum Second Empire, Italianate NRHP-listed (refnum 74001788). The courthouse was built between 1869 and 1870. It was the second courthouse to serve the county, with the first demolished in 1868. The final cost of the project was $150,000. The architecture is primarily red brick and stone. The roof was designed in the Mansard style. The courthouse features a gold leaf cupola clocktower with four faces. The main courtroom, located on the second floor measured 100 feet (30 m) by 82 feet (25 m), with a 30 feet (9.1 m) ceiling. The large clock in the cupola was the largest in the county at the time. The courthouse held its final session on November 11, 1970. Today, the entire bell tower is supported by scaffolding set up in the main court room of the building, due to the age of the building's supports.
Indiana County Courthouse Indiana County Courthouse.jpg Indiana Indiana 1968 Lawrie and Green Modern [67][68]
Jefferson County Courthouse Jefferson County Courthouse Brookville PA Nov 09.jpg Jefferson Brookville 1869 James W. Drum Italianate [69][70]
Old Juniata County Courthouse First-Juniata-County-Courthouse.jpg Juniata Mifflintown 1833 unknown Classical Revival See this reference for the Courthouse Brochure[71]
Juniata County Courthouse Juniata County Courthouse.jpg Juniata Mifflintown 1875 L.M. Simon Classical Revival See this reference for the Courthouse Brochure[71] [72][73]
Lackawanna County Courthouse Lackawanna County Courthouse Nov 09.jpg Lackawanna Scranton
41°24′29″N 75°39′46″W / 41.408056°N 75.662778°W / 41.408056; -75.662778 (Lackawanna County Courthouse and John Mitchell Monument)
1884 I.G. Perry Romanesque Revival NRHP-listed (refnum 97001257). The courthouse was built in 1884, and is a 3+12-story rectangular masonry building, with a raised basement. The building measures approximately 100 by 140 feet (30 by 43 m). It features a five-story clock tower. Pennsylvania Historical Marker Text: In May 1902, 150,000 mineworkers struck for six months for union recognition, higher wages, shorter hours, and other demands. The Anthracite Coal Strike Commission, set up by President Theodore Roosevelt, held hearings at the Lackawanna County Courthouse and granted some demands in March 1903. Among the longest in U.S. history, the strike introduced unbiased federal intervention in labor disputes. [74][75]
Old Lancaster County Courthouse Old Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, courthouse, pre-1853.jpg Lancaster Lancaster
40°02′16″N 76°18′21″W / 40.03776°N 76.30588°W / 40.03776; -76.30588 (Lancaster County Courthouse)
1729 unknown Georgian Pennsylvania Historical Marker Text: Old courthouse stood in the center of this square, 1739–1853. Here Continental Congress met for a day, Sept. 27, 1777, thus making Lancaster one of the capitals of the United States.
Lancaster County Courthouse Lancaster Co PA Courthouse.jpg Lancaster Lancaster
40°02′18″N 76°18′15″W / 40.038333°N 76.304167°W / 40.038333; -76.304167 (Lancaster County Courthouse)
1855 Samuel Sloan Romanesque Revival NRHP-listed (refnum 78002415). The original building was built between 1852 and 1855. [76][77]
Lawrence County Courthouse Stairs at the Lawrence County Courthouse.jpg Lawrence New Castle
40°59′54″N 80°20′22″W / 40.998333°N 80.339444°W / 40.998333; -80.339444 (Lawrence County Courthouse)
1852 unknown Greek Revival NRHP-listed (refnum 78002419). The original building was built between 1850 and 1855, and is a two-story, six bay by three bay structure. It features a portico with six Ionic order columns and a cupola. [78][79]
Old Lebanon County Courthouse Lebanon-PA-Lebanon-County-Courthouse-Pennsylvania-c1905-Postcard.jpg Lebanon Lebanon 1818 unknown Federal
Lebanon County and City Building (and courthouse) Photos and information found at this reference: [80] Lebanon Lebanon 1960 William Lynch Murray Modern The Lebanon County and City Building is the home of the Court of Common Pleas. [81][82]
Old Lehigh County Courthouse 2011 - Old Lehigh County Courthouse.jpg Lehigh Allentown
40°36′13″N 75°28′04″W / 40.603611°N 75.4677784°W / 40.603611; -75.4677784 (Old Lehigh County Courthouse)
1819 unknown Italianate NRHP-listed (refnum 81000550). The original section was built between 1814 and 1819, and was a 2+12-story, stone building with a hipped roof. It was remodeled and enlarged in 1864.
Lehigh County Courthouse 2019 - Lehigh County Courthouse - Jan 16 - 2 - Allentown PA.jpg Lehigh Allentown 1965 Wolf & Hahn Modern [83][84]
Old Luzerne County Courthouse Old Luzerne, Pennsylvania, Courthouse, ca. 1907.jpg Luzerne Wilkes-Barre 1856 Romanesque Revival
Luzerne County Courthouse Luzerne County Courthouse2.jpg Luzerne Wilkes-Barre
41°15′05″N 75°52′46″W / 41.251389°N 75.879444°W / 41.251389; -75.879444 (Luzerne County Courthouse)
1909 Frederick John Osterling Classical Revival NRHP-listed (refnum 80003566). The courthouse was built between 1906 and 1909. It is a cruciform plan building in the style, with a domed central rotunda 53 feet in diameter. It is built of Ohio sandstone, reinforced concrete, and terra cotta. [85][86]
Old Lycoming County Courthouse Old Lycoming County Courthouse, Williamsport, Pennsylvania, 1860.jpg Lycoming Williamsport 1860 Samuel Sloan Italianate
Lycoming County Courthouse Lycoming County Courthouse.JPG Lycoming Williamsport 1970 Wagner, Hartman Modern [87][88]
Old McKean County Courthouses McKean County, Pennsylvania, Courthouse 1858.jpg McKean Smethport 1827, 1851, 1881 M.E. Beebe (1881) Federal (1851) The 1851 McKean County Courthouse is pictured [89]
McKean County Courthouse McKean County Courthouse.jpg McKean Smethport
41°48′35″N 78°26′52″W / 41.809590°N 78.447720°W / 41.809590; -78.447720 (McKean County Court House)
1942 Thomas K. Hendrix Classic Revival [90][91]
Mercer County Court House Mercer County Courthouse Pennsylvania 2010.jpg Mercer Mercer 1909 Owsley Boucherle & Owsley Beaux Arts [92][93]
Old Mifflin County Courthouse Mifflin County Courthouse and War Memorial Apr 10.JPG Mifflin Lewistown
40°35′51″N 77°34′32″W / 40.5975°N 77.575556°W / 40.5975; -77.575556 (Mifflin County Courthouse)
1843 Greek Revival NRHP-listed (refnum 76001649). It was built in 1842–1843, and is a 2+12-story, brick building. It is three bays wide and the original building measured 48 feet by 82 feet. It was enlarged by 48 feet to the rear in 1878. It features a pedimented entryway with two engaged pilasters and prominent cupola. The courthouse has been updated and restored, with the second floor courtroom restored to a late 19th-century appearance.
Mifflin County Courthouse Photo found at this reference: [94] Mifflin Lewistown 1978 Jon Spalding Modern [95][96]
Monroe County Courthouse Monroe County Courthouse Nov 09.jpg Monroe Stroudsburg
40°59′13″N 75°11′43″W / 40.986944°N 75.195278°W / 40.986944; -75.195278 (Monroe County Courthouse)
1890 T.I. Lacey & Sons Romanesque Revival NRHP-listed (refnum 9000097). The original section was built in 1890, and is a three-story, ashlar sandstone and limestone building measuring 65 feet wide and 180 feet long [97][98]
Montgomery County Courthouse Montgomery County Courthouse Pennsylvania - Douglas Muth.jpg Montgomery Norristown 1854 Schermerhorn and Reinhold Classical Revival This courthouse was the location of the Bill Cosby sexual assault trial and conviction in 2018. [99][100]
Montour County Courthouse Courthouse Montour Co PA.jpg Montour Danville 1871 O'Malley Italianate [101][102]
Northampton County Courthouse Northampton County, Pennsylvania, Courthouse 1905.jpg Northampton Easton 1861 C. Graham Classical Revival [103][104]
Northumberland County Courthouse Northumberland County Courthouse - Sunbury, PA.jpg Northumberland Sunbury
40°51′42″N 76°47′43″W / 40.861667°N 76.795278°W / 40.861667; -76.795278 (Northumberland County Courthouse)
1865 Samuel Sloan Romanesque Revival NRHP-listed (refnum 74001800). It is a three-story, brick building. A three-story wing was added in 1911. It features three arched doors on the front facade, brownstone quoins at the corners, and a clock tower with a copper dome. The tower bell was donated by Simon Cameron. In 1878, it was the site of the murder trial and conviction of the last Molly Maguire, Peter McManus. [105][106]
Perry County Courthouse Perry Co PA Courthouse.JPG Perry New Bloomfield
40°25′12″N 77°11′15″W / 40.42°N 77.1875°W / 40.42; -77.1875 (Perry County Courthouse)
1827 Jacob Bishop Greek Revival NRHP-listed (refnum 75001659). The courthouse was built in 1826 and completed the next year. It was extensively altered in 1868. It is a two-story white brick structure, three bays wide and six bays long. The low hipped roof is crowned by a cupola dated to 1826. An annex was completed about 1892. [107][108]
Old Philadelphia County Courthouses Old Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Courthouse, pre-1789.jpgCongress Hall exterior.jpg Philadelphia Philadelphia
39°56′57″N 75°09′03″W / 39.9491°N 75.1507°W / 39.9491; -75.1507 (Congress Hall (Old Philadelphia County Courthouse))
1709, 1789 Georgian The first illustration shows the early courthouse built in 1709, and razed in 1837. It was located in the center of what is now Market Street. The second illustration is of the building is known as "Congress Hall" for having housed the US Congress when Philadelphia was capital city of the United States. During the almost ten years it served as the federal capitol building, Congress Hall witnessed many historic events including the admittance of Vermont, Kentucky, and Tennessee as new states. The United States Bill of Rights was ratified at Congress Hall in 1791. The second Presidential inauguration of George Washington took place in the House chamber in 1793, as did inauguration of John Adams in 1797. Congress also used the time to establish the First Bank of the United States, the Federal Mint, and the United States Department of the Navy. The Jay Treaty, which secured a temporary peace with Great Britain, was also ratified at Congress Hall in 1796. After the capital moved to Washington in 1800, Congress Hall returned to its original function as the Philadelphia County Courthouse and served as the location of both state and federal courts during the early 19th century.
Philadelphia City Hall (and courthouse) City Hall1.JPG Philadelphia Philadelphia
39°57′09″N 75°09′49″W / 39.952394°N 75.163597°W / 39.952394; -75.163597 (Philadelphia City Hall)
1901 John McArthur Jr., Thomas Ustick Walter Second Empire NRHP-listed (refnum 76001666). Courtrooms for various trial-level courts, and for the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania's Philadelphia sessions, are located in the City Hall. [109][110]
Justice Juanita Kidd Stout Center for Criminal Justice Criminal Justice Center, Philadelphia PA.jpg Philadelphia Philadelphia
39°57′13″N 75°09′42″E / 39.953709°N 75.161622°E / 39.953709; 75.161622 (Justice Juanita Kidd Stout Center for Criminal Justice)
1994 Postmodern The Justice Juanita Kidd Stout Center for Criminal Justice (formerly the Criminal Justice Center or CJC) is the main criminal courthouse of the First Judicial District of Pennsylvania (which comprises Philadelphia), housing the Criminal Section of the Philadelphia Court of Common Pleas and the Criminal Division of the Philadelphia Municipal Court. It is a 17-story building completed in 1994 to alleviate pressure from courtrooms located in Philadelphia City Hall. The center is located at 1301 Filbert Street. In 2012 it was renamed in honor of the late Justice Juanita Kidd Stout. It is 604,000 square feet with 66 courtrooms, 60 judges' chambers, secure holding / detention cells, and supporting administrative and processing areas. The building is framed in steel with stone and architectural precast cladding. Lobbies, corridors, and other common spaces have high-finish terrazzo floors, interior molded stone, and glass fiber reinforced gypsum ceilings. Courtrooms and chambers have an extensive amount of detailed carpentry in the finishes of wall panels, judge and jury benches, doors, framing, and other millwork. The facility also Includes one of the largest central cooling plants on the east coast, over 5,000 tons.[111]
Penn Mutual Building Bicentennial moon tree.jpg Philadelphia Philadelphia
39°56′50″N 75°09′03″W / 39.947305°N 75.150749°W / 39.947305; -75.150749 (530 Walnut Street)
1914 Edgar Viguers Seeler Beaux Arts Located at 530 Walnut Street, it houses the Philadelphia sessions of the Superior Court.
Old Pike County Courthouse Old Stone Courthouse 2018-10-30 523.jpg Pike Milford 1815 unknown German Colonial The Old Stone Courthouse in Milford, Pennsylvania was built in 1814-15 and was in use from 1815 to 1874, when the current courthouse, which is located across the street, was completed. The first church services of the First Presbyterian (1823), Methodist (1825) and Episcopal (1866) Churches were held in the courthouse, which also served as the County Jail in 1815. It is located within the Milford Historic District.
Pike County Courthouse Pike County Courthouse Milford PA.jpg Pike Milford
41°19′28″N 74°48′04″W / 41.324444°N 74.801111°W / 41.324444; -74.801111 (Pike County Courthouse)
1874 George Barton Second Empire NRHP-listed (refnum 79002340). It was built in 1873, and is a 2+12-story, eight-bay-by-six-bay, brick building. It features a projecting front section with pediment and a square cupola. [112][113]
Pittsburgh City-County Building Pittsburgh City-County Building in 2016.jpg Allegheny Pittsburgh
40°26′18″N 79°59′50″W / 40.438367°N 79.997147°W / 40.438367; -79.997147 (Pittsburgh City-County Building)
1917 Henry Hornbostel Beaux Arts Location for the Pittsburgh sessions of the Supreme Court.
Potter County Courthouse Pottercourthousecoudersport.jpg Potter Coudersport
41°46′28″N 78°01′14″W / 41.774444°N 78.020556°W / 41.774444; -78.020556 (Potter County Courthouse)
1853 William Bell Greek Revival, Victorian NRHP-listed (refnum 75001664). The construction began in 1851 and completed in 1853. [114][115]
Old Schuylkill County Courthouse Old Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania, Courthouse ca. 1900.jpg Schuylkill Pottsville 1851 Federal
Schuylkill County Courthouse Court house, Pottsville, Pa (68642).jpg Schuylkill Pottsville 1892 M.E. Beebe Romanesque Revival [116][117]
Snyder County Courthouse Middleburg, Pennsylvania (4036369885).jpg Snyder Middleburg 1855, 1915 J.F. Stetler Italianate [118][119]
Old Somerset County Courthouse Old Somerset Count, Pennsylvania, Courthouse.jpg Somerset Somerset 1853 Classical Revival
Somerset County Courthouse Somerset County Courthouse.jpg Somerset Somerset
40°00′35″N 79°04′41″W / 40.009722°N 79.078056°W / 40.009722; -79.078056 (Somerset County Courthouse)
1906 J.C. Fuller Beaux Arts NRHP-listed (refnum 80003634). Built between 1904 and 1906, it is a two-story building measuring 146 feet by 112 feet, and 135 feet tall. Made of Indiana limestone, it sits on a sandstone foundation. The building has a terra cotta tile roof, and central tower with copper dome. It features a semicircular portico supported by four unfluted Corinthian order. [120][121]
State-wide locations Lower Southampton Township District Court, BucksCo PA.JPG state-wide state-wide variable variable variable Numerous magisterial district courts are located throughout Pennsylvania. They are courts of minor jurisdiction, typically housed in small buildings or even strip-mall store-front type locations for easy access by the public. They handle minor criminal offenses including misdemeanors, infractions such as traffic and non-traffic citations, and petty offenses, as well as civil matters like civil wedding ceremonies and emergency Protection from Abuse petitions. The magisterial district courts also resolve small civil disputes such as breaches of contracts, landlord-tenant issues, and torts, not exceeding a monetary recovery of $12,000 including expenses like lawyer's fees and filing fees. The court pictured is the 07-1-06 Magisterial District Court in Feasterville, Bucks County.
Sullivan County Courthouse Sullivan County Courthouse.jpg Sullivan Laporte
41°25′25″N 76°29′39″W / 41.423611°N 76.494167°W / 41.423611; -76.494167 (Sullivan County Courthouse)
1894 Wagner and Reitmeyer Romanesque Revival NRHP-listed (refnum 78002472). It is a rectangular building measuring approximately 92 feet by 60 feet, built of brick with a slate roof. The building is located in the smallest and highest county seat in Pennsylvania, at an elevation of over 2,000 feet (610 m) above sea level. [122][123]
Susquehanna County Courthouse Susquehanna County County Seat.jpg Susquehanna Montrose
41°50′04″N 75°52′35″W / 41.834444°N 75.876389°W / 41.834444; -75.876389 (Susquehanna County Courthouse Complex)
1855 William H. Boyd, Avery Frink Greek Revival NRHP-listed (refnum 96000706). The original section of the courthouse was built in 1854–1855, and is a three bay by seven bay, two-story brick structure. It features a pedimented portico with fluted Ionic order columns and five bay arcade at the first level. It has a shallow gable roof topped by an octagonal cupola. [124][125]
Tioga County Courthouse Tioga County Courthouse Official.jpg Tioga Wellsboro 1835 unknown Federal [126][127]
Old Union County Courthouse Old Union County Courthouse (New Berlin, Pennsylvania) 3.jpg Union New Berlin
40°52′43″N 76°59′12″W / 40.878611°N 76.986667°W / 40.878611; -76.986667 (Old Union County Courthouse)
1815 unknown Federal NRHP-listed (refnum 72001179). It was built in 1815, and renovated in 1855–1857, to convert it to a schoolhouse. It is a 2+12-story, brick building, three bays wide and four bays deep with a gable roof. The roof features a center cupola. It was used as a school until 1952.
Union County Courthouse Court house, Lewisburg, Pa (79576).jpg Union Lewisburg 1855 Lewis Palmer Greek Revival [128][129]
Venango County Courthouse VenangoCourthouse.JPG Venango Franklin 1868 Samuel Sloan Italianate [130][131]
Warren County Courthouse Warren County Courthouse Jul 12.jpg Warren Warren
41°50′55″N 79°08′50″W / 41.848611°N 79.147222°W / 41.848611; -79.147222 (Warren County Courthouse)
1877 M.E. Beebe Second Empire NRHP-listed (refnum 77001198). It was built in 1876–1877, and is a 2+12-story, brick and sandstone building. It has a slate covered mansard roof. It measures 72 feet by 122 feet, and has a large 4-sided dome topped by a square clock tower and statue of justice. [132][58]
Washington County Courthouse Washington County Courthouse (Pennsylvania) south.jpg Washington Washington
40°10′14″N 80°14′45″W / 40.17045°N 80.245803°W / 40.17045; -80.245803 (Washington County Courthouse)
1900 Frederick John Osterling Beaux Arts NRHP-listed (refnum 74001812). [133][134]
Wayne County Courthouse Wayne County courthouse mod.jpg Wayne Honesdale 1880 J.A. Wood Italianate [135][136]
Old Westmoreland County Courthouses Third Court House 1854 Greensburg.png Westmoreland Greensburg
40°18′10″N 79°32′41″E / 40.302645°N 79.544636°E / 40.302645; 79.544636 (Westmoreland County Courthouse)
1787, 1801, 1854 The first courthouse was used from 1787 to 1801. The second courthouse was demolished in 1854 and the third (pictured) was demolished in 1901.
Westmoreland County Courthouse Greensburg-pennsylvania-courthouse.jpg Westmoreland Greensburg
40°18′10″N 79°32′41″E / 40.302645°N 79.544636°E / 40.302645; 79.544636 (Westmoreland County Courthouse)
1906 William Kaufman Beaux Arts NRHP-listed (refnum 78002485). [137][138]
Wyoming County Courthouse Wyoming County Courthouse.jpg Wyoming Tunkhannock 1870 D.R. Nott Italianate [139][140]
Old York County Courthouse Old York Cty Courthouse.JPG York York
39°57′44″N 76°43′39″W / 39.9623°N 76.7274°W / 39.9623; -76.7274 (Old York County Courthouse)
1754 unknown Georgian A two-story red-colored-brick-and-wood structure on landscaped grounds; reconstructed in 1976.[141] Pennsylvania Historical Marker Text: Continental Congress held its session, Sept. 30, 1777–June 28, 1778 in Courthouse which stood in the center of this square. Here, Treaties with France and Articles of Confederation were adopted. The Articles were our nation's first constitution. Adopted November 15, 1777, in the York County Courthouse, the Articles united the 13 colonies by establishing the government of the United States of America. Remained in effect until replaced by the Constitution in 1789.
Old York County Courthouse The Historical Sketch, and Account of the Centennial Celebration at York, PA., July 4, 1876. (1876) (14761215501).jpg York York 1837 Classical Revival
Old York County Courthouse York County, Pennsylvania, Courthouse 1915.jpg York York 1900 John Augustine Dempwolf Beaux Arts The 1900 Courthouse pictured in a 1915 postcard.
York County Judicial Center York York 2004 Hellmuth, Obata & Kassabaum Postmodern The building is a "six story red colored brick, glass and concrete structure. The west front has a semi-circular portico with recessed entrance. On the north and south are two story projecting sections. Behind the portico is a sold glass wall with large towers on the north and south sides. The roof line is flat."[142] [143][144]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Williams, pp. throughout
  2. ^ "The Unified JUDICIAL SYSTEM of PENNSYLVANIA, Adams County Courts". Retrieved February 20, 2020.
  3. ^ "Adams County Court of Common Pleas". Retrieved February 21, 2020.
  4. ^ "The Unified JUDICIAL SYSTEM of PENNSYLVANIA, Allegheny County Courts". Retrieved February 21, 2020.
  5. ^ "Fifth Judicial District of Pennsylvania". Retrieved February 21, 2020.
  6. ^ "The Unified JUDICIAL SYSTEM of PENNSYLVANIA, Armstrong County Courts". Retrieved February 21, 2020.
  7. ^ "Armstrong County Court of Common Pleas". Retrieved February 21, 2020.
  8. ^ "The Unified JUDICIAL SYSTEM of PENNSYLVANIA, Beaver County Courts". Retrieved February 20, 2020.
  9. ^ "Welcome to the Courts of Beaver County". Retrieved February 21, 2020.
  10. ^ "The Unified JUDICIAL SYSTEM of PENNSYLVANIA, Bedford County Courts". Retrieved February 20, 2020.
  11. ^ "Courts". Retrieved February 21, 2020.
  12. ^ "The Unified JUDICIAL SYSTEM of PENNSYLVANIA, Berks County Courts". Retrieved February 20, 2020.
  13. ^ "Berks County Court of Common Pleas". Retrieved February 21, 2020.
  14. ^ "The Unified JUDICIAL SYSTEM of PENNSYLVANIA, Blair County Courts". Retrieved February 21, 2020.
  15. ^ "Blair County Courts". Retrieved February 21, 2020.
  16. ^ "The Unified JUDICIAL SYSTEM of PENNSYLVANIA, Bradford County Courts". Retrieved February 20, 2020.
  17. ^ "Bradford County Court Administration". Retrieved February 21, 2020.
  18. ^ "The Unified JUDICIAL SYSTEM of PENNSYLVANIA, Bucks County Courts". Retrieved February 20, 2020.
  19. ^ "Bucks County Judicial System". Retrieved February 20, 2020.
  20. ^ "The Unified JUDICIAL SYSTEM of PENNSYLVANIA, Butler County Courts". Retrieved February 20, 2020.
  21. ^ "Butler County Court Administration". Retrieved February 21, 2020.
  22. ^ "The Unified JUDICIAL SYSTEM of PENNSYLVANIA, Cambria County Courts". Retrieved February 21, 2020.
  23. ^ "Cambria County Prothonotary Office". Retrieved February 20, 2020.
  24. ^ "The Unified JUDICIAL SYSTEM of PENNSYLVANIA, Cameron County Courts". Retrieved February 20, 2020.
  25. ^ "Cameron County Court of Common Pleas". Retrieved February 21, 2020.
  26. ^ "The Unified JUDICIAL SYSTEM of PENNSYLVANIA, Carbon County Courts". Retrieved February 20, 2020.
  27. ^ "Carbon County Court of Common Pleas". Retrieved February 21, 2020.
  28. ^ "The Unified JUDICIAL SYSTEM of PENNSYLVANIA, Centre County Courts". Retrieved February 20, 2020.
  29. ^ "Centre County Judiciary". Retrieved February 21, 2020.
  30. ^ "The Unified JUDICIAL SYSTEM of PENNSYLVANIA, Chester County Courts". Retrieved February 20, 2020.
  31. ^ "Chester County Court of Common Pleas". Retrieved February 22, 2020.
  32. ^ "The Unified JUDICIAL SYSTEM of PENNSYLVANIA, Clarion County Courts". Retrieved February 21, 2020.
  33. ^ "Clarion County Court of Common Pleas". Retrieved February 23, 2020.
  34. ^ "The Unified JUDICIAL SYSTEM of PENNSYLVANIA, Clearfield County Courts". Retrieved February 21, 2020.
  35. ^ "Clearfield County Prothonotary & Clerk of Courts". Retrieved February 23, 2020.
  36. ^ "The Unified JUDICIAL SYSTEM of PENNSYLVANIA, Clinton County Courts". Retrieved February 20, 2020.
  37. ^ "Clinton County Court Services". Retrieved February 20, 2020.
  38. ^ "The Unified JUDICIAL SYSTEM of PENNSYLVANIA, Columbia County Courts". Retrieved February 20, 2020.
  39. ^ "Columbia County Court of Common Pleas". Retrieved February 22, 2020.
  40. ^ "Crawford County Judicial Center".
  41. ^ "The Unified JUDICIAL SYSTEM of PENNSYLVANIA, Crawford County Courts". Retrieved February 21, 2020.
  42. ^ "Crawford County Court of Common Pleas". Retrieved February 20, 2020.
  43. ^ "Old Courthouse Carlisle".
  44. ^ "The Unified JUDICIAL SYSTEM of PENNSYLVANIA, Cumberland County Courts". Retrieved February 20, 2020.
  45. ^ "Cumberland County Courts & Criminal Justice". Retrieved February 22, 2020.
  46. ^ "The Unified JUDICIAL SYSTEM of PENNSYLVANIA, Dauphin County Courts". Retrieved February 21, 2020.
  47. ^ "Dauphin County Courts". Retrieved February 22, 2020.
  48. ^ "The Unified JUDICIAL SYSTEM of PENNSYLVANIA, Delaware County Courts". Retrieved February 20, 2020.
  49. ^ "Delaware County Court of Common Pleas". Retrieved February 22, 2020.
  50. ^ "The Unified JUDICIAL SYSTEM of PENNSYLVANIA, Elk County Courts". Retrieved February 20, 2020.
  51. ^ "59th Judicial District". Retrieved February 22, 2020.
  52. ^ "The Unified JUDICIAL SYSTEM of PENNSYLVANIA, Erie County Courts". Retrieved February 21, 2020.
  53. ^ "Erie County Prothonotary". Retrieved February 23, 2020.
  54. ^ "The Unified JUDICIAL SYSTEM of PENNSYLVANIA, Fayette County Courts". Retrieved February 21, 2020.
  55. ^ "Fayette County Court of Common Pleas". Retrieved February 22, 2020.
  56. ^ Williams, p.99
  57. ^ "The Unified JUDICIAL SYSTEM of PENNSYLVANIA, Forest County Courts". Retrieved February 20, 2020.
  58. ^ a b "Warren-Forest Court of Common Pleas". Retrieved February 22, 2020.
  59. ^ "The Unified JUDICIAL SYSTEM of PENNSYLVANIA, Franklin County Courts". Retrieved February 20, 2020.
  60. ^ "Franklin County Judicial System". Retrieved February 22, 2020.
  61. ^ "The Unified JUDICIAL SYSTEM of PENNSYLVANIA, Fulton County Courts". Retrieved February 20, 2020.
  62. ^ "Fulton County Court of Common Pleas". Retrieved February 20, 2020.
  63. ^ "The Unified JUDICIAL SYSTEM of PENNSYLVANIA, Greene County Courts". Retrieved February 20, 2020.
  64. ^ "Greene County Court of Common Pleas". Retrieved February 23, 2020.
  65. ^ "The Unified JUDICIAL SYSTEM of PENNSYLVANIA, Huntingdon County Courts". Retrieved February 21, 2020.
  66. ^ "Huntingdon County Court of Common Pleas". Retrieved February 23, 2020.
  67. ^ "The Unified JUDICIAL SYSTEM of PENNSYLVANIA, Indiana County Courts". Retrieved February 20, 2020.
  68. ^ "Indiana County Court of Common Pleas". Retrieved February 22, 2020.
  69. ^ "The Unified JUDICIAL SYSTEM of PENNSYLVANIA, Jefferson County Courts". Retrieved February 20, 2020.
  70. ^ "Jefferson County Court of Common Pleas". Retrieved February 23, 2020.
  71. ^ a b "Courthouse Brochure" (PDF). Retrieved February 22, 2020.
  72. ^ "The Unified JUDICIAL SYSTEM of PENNSYLVANIA, Juniata County Courts". Retrieved February 20, 2020.
  73. ^ "Juniata County Prothonotary". Retrieved February 22, 2020.
  74. ^ "The Unified JUDICIAL SYSTEM of PENNSYLVANIA, Lackawanna County Courts". Retrieved February 21, 2020.
  75. ^ "Lackawanna County Judiciary". Retrieved February 23, 2020.
  76. ^ "The Unified JUDICIAL SYSTEM of PENNSYLVANIA, Lancaster County Courts". Retrieved February 20, 2020.
  77. ^ "Lancaster County Court of Common Pleas". Retrieved February 22, 2020.
  78. ^ "The Unified JUDICIAL SYSTEM of PENNSYLVANIA, Lawrence County Courts". Retrieved February 21, 2020.
  79. ^ "Lawrence County Court of Common Pleas". Retrieved February 22, 2020.
  80. ^ "Lebanon County Courthouse".
  81. ^ "The Unified JUDICIAL SYSTEM of PENNSYLVANIA, Lebanon County Courts". Retrieved February 20, 2020.
  82. ^ "Lebanon County Court System". Retrieved February 22, 2020.
  83. ^ "The Unified JUDICIAL SYSTEM of PENNSYLVANIA, Lehigh County Courts". Retrieved February 20, 2020.
  84. ^ "Lehigh County Court of Common Pleas". Retrieved February 22, 2020.
  85. ^ "The Unified JUDICIAL SYSTEM of PENNSYLVANIA, Luzerne County Courts". Retrieved February 20, 2020.
  86. ^ "Luzerne County Court of Common Pleas". Retrieved February 22, 2020.
  87. ^ "The Unified JUDICIAL SYSTEM of PENNSYLVANIA, Lycoming County Courts". Retrieved February 20, 2020.
  88. ^ "Lycoming County Prothonotary/Clerk of Courts". Retrieved February 22, 2020.
  89. ^ "McKean County Second and Third Courthouses". Retrieved February 22, 2020.
  90. ^ "The Unified JUDICIAL SYSTEM of PENNSYLVANIA, McKean County Courts". Retrieved February 20, 2020.
  91. ^ "McKean County Court of Common Pleas". Retrieved February 22, 2020.
  92. ^ "The Unified JUDICIAL SYSTEM of PENNSYLVANIA, Mercer County Courts". Retrieved February 20, 2020.
  93. ^ "The Mercer County Court System". Retrieved February 22, 2020.
  94. ^ "Mifflin County Courthouse".
  95. ^ "The Unified JUDICIAL SYSTEM of PENNSYLVANIA, Mifflin County Courts". Retrieved February 20, 2020.
  96. ^ "Mifflin County Court of Common Pleas". Retrieved February 22, 2020.
  97. ^ "The Unified JUDICIAL SYSTEM of PENNSYLVANIA, Monroe County Courts". Retrieved February 21, 2020.
  98. ^ "Monroe County Court of Common Pleas". Retrieved February 20, 2020.
  99. ^ "The Unified JUDICIAL SYSTEM of PENNSYLVANIA, Montgomery County Courts". Retrieved February 20, 2020.
  100. ^ "Montgomery County Court of Common Pleas". Retrieved February 22, 2020.
  101. ^ "The Unified JUDICIAL SYSTEM of PENNSYLVANIA, Montour County Courts". Retrieved February 20, 2020.
  102. ^ "Montour County Court of Common Pleas". Retrieved February 22, 2020.
  103. ^ "The Unified JUDICIAL SYSTEM of PENNSYLVANIA, Northampton County Courts". Retrieved February 20, 2020.
  104. ^ "Northampton County Court of Common Pleas". Retrieved February 22, 2020.
  105. ^ "The Unified JUDICIAL SYSTEM of PENNSYLVANIA, Northumberland County Courts". Retrieved February 20, 2020.
  106. ^ "Northumberland County Prothonotary". Retrieved February 22, 2020.
  107. ^ "The Unified JUDICIAL SYSTEM of PENNSYLVANIA, Perry County Courts". Retrieved February 20, 2020.
  108. ^ "Perry County Courts". Retrieved February 22, 2020.
  109. ^ "The Unified JUDICIAL SYSTEM of PENNSYLVANIA, Philadelphia County Courts". Retrieved February 21, 2020.
  110. ^ "Philadelphia Courts First Judicial District". Retrieved February 21, 2020.
  111. ^ "Philadelphia Criminal Justice Center".
  112. ^ "The Unified JUDICIAL SYSTEM of PENNSYLVANIA, Pike County Courts". Retrieved February 20, 2020.
  113. ^ "Pike County Court System". Retrieved February 22, 2020.
  114. ^ "The Unified JUDICIAL SYSTEM of PENNSYLVANIA, Potter County Courts". Retrieved February 21, 2020.
  115. ^ "Potter County Prothonotary/Clerk of Court/Orphans Court". Retrieved February 22, 2020.
  116. ^ "The Unified JUDICIAL SYSTEM of PENNSYLVANIA, Schuylkill County Courts". Retrieved February 21, 2020.
  117. ^ "Schuylkill County Court House Information". Retrieved February 22, 2020.
  118. ^ "The Unified JUDICIAL SYSTEM of PENNSYLVANIA, Snyder County Courts". Retrieved February 21, 2020.
  119. ^ "Snyder County Courts". Retrieved February 22, 2020.
  120. ^ "The Unified JUDICIAL SYSTEM of PENNSYLVANIA, Somerset County Courts". Retrieved February 20, 2020.
  121. ^ "Somerset County Court of Common Pleas". Retrieved February 22, 2020.
  122. ^ "The Unified JUDICIAL SYSTEM of PENNSYLVANIA, Sullivan County Courts". Retrieved February 20, 2020.
  123. ^ "Sullivan County Prothonotary". Retrieved February 22, 2020.
  124. ^ "The Unified JUDICIAL SYSTEM of PENNSYLVANIA, Susquehanna County Courts". Retrieved February 21, 2020.
  125. ^ "Susquehanna County Court of Common Pleas". Retrieved February 22, 2020.
  126. ^ "The Unified JUDICIAL SYSTEM of PENNSYLVANIA, Tioga County Courts". Retrieved February 20, 2020.
  127. ^ "Tioga County Court of Common Pleas". Retrieved February 20, 2020.
  128. ^ "The Unified JUDICIAL SYSTEM of PENNSYLVANIA, Union County Courts". Retrieved February 20, 2020.
  129. ^ "Union County Court of Common Pleas". Retrieved February 22, 2020.
  130. ^ "The Unified JUDICIAL SYSTEM of PENNSYLVANIA, Venango County Courts". Retrieved February 20, 2020.
  131. ^ "Venango County Court Offices". Retrieved February 20, 2020.
  132. ^ "The Unified JUDICIAL SYSTEM of PENNSYLVANIA, Warren County Courts". Retrieved February 20, 2020.
  133. ^ "The Unified JUDICIAL SYSTEM of PENNSYLVANIA, Washington County Courts". Retrieved February 20, 2020.
  134. ^ "Washington County Courts". Retrieved February 22, 2020.
  135. ^ "The Unified JUDICIAL SYSTEM of PENNSYLVANIA, Wayne County Courts". Retrieved February 20, 2020.
  136. ^ "Wayne County Court of Common Pleas". Retrieved February 22, 2020.
  137. ^ "The Unified JUDICIAL SYSTEM of PENNSYLVANIA, Westmoreland County Courts". Retrieved February 20, 2020.
  138. ^ "Westmoreland County Courts". Retrieved February 22, 2020.
  139. ^ "The Unified JUDICIAL SYSTEM of PENNSYLVANIA, Wyoming County Courts". Retrieved February 20, 2020.
  140. ^ "Wyoming County Prothonotary, Clerk of Courts and Clerk of Orphans Courts". Retrieved February 20, 2020.
  141. ^ "York County, US Courthouses".
  142. ^ "York County, US Courthouses".
  143. ^ "The Unified JUDICIAL SYSTEM of PENNSYLVANIA, York County Courts". Retrieved February 20, 2020.
  144. ^ "York County Court of Common Pleas". Retrieved February 20, 2020.

Source[edit]

  • Williams, Oliver P. (2001). County Courthouses of Pennsylvania, A Guide. Mechanicsburg, Pennsylvania: Stackpole Books. ISBN 0-8117-2738-6.

External links[edit]