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These featured pictures, as scheduled below, appeared as the picture of the day (POTD) on the English Wikipedia's Main Page in the last 30 days.

You can add an automatically updating POTD template to your user page using {{Pic of the day}} (version with blurb) or {{POTD}} (version without blurb). For instructions on how to make custom POTD layouts, see Wikipedia:Picture of the day.Purge server cache


January 22

Charaxes jasius

Charaxes jasius, the two-tailed pasha, is a species of butterfly in the family Nymphalidae. Occurring in maquis shrubland in southern Europe and northern Africa, the larva typically feeds on the leaves of the strawberry tree. It has a wingspan reaching 76 to 83 mm (3.0 to 3.3 in) in males, with females being slightly larger. This butterfly of the subspecies C. j. jasius was photographed in Sithonia, Greece.

Photograph credit: Charles James Sharp


January 21

I puritani

I puritani (The Puritans) is an 1835 opera by Vincenzo Bellini, set to an Italian libretto by Count Carlo Pepoli. This aquatint shows the set design for the Hall of Arms in act 1, scene 3, as it appeared at the opera's premiere at the Théâtre-Italien in Paris in January 1835. The opera was a great success; as Bellini reported to a friend: "The French had all gone mad; there were such noise and such shouts that they themselves were astonished at being so carried away."

Aquatint credit: Luigi Verardi and Vittore Pedretti, after Domenico Ferri; restored by Adam Cuerden


January 20

Obverse and reverse of a ten-dollar National Bank Note

Cecil Brown (1850–1917) was an American attorney, politician, businessman, and banker in the Kingdom, Republic, and Territory of Hawaii. He was the founding president of the first national bank chartered in Hawaii. This ten-dollar National Bank Note, issued in 1900, bears Brown's signature at the bottom right of the obverse.

Banknote design credit: Office of the Comptroller of the Currency and the Bureau of Engraving and Printing; photographed by Andrew Shiva


January 19

Berlin Modernism Housing Estates

Berlin Modernism Housing Estates is a World Heritage Site designated in 2008, comprising six subsidized-housing estates in Berlin, Germany. Dating mainly from the years of the Weimar Republic (1919–1933), when the city of Berlin was particularly progressive socially, politically and culturally, these buildings contributed to improving housing and living conditions for people with low incomes through innovative approaches to architecture and urban planning. This photograph is an aerial view of the Hufeisensiedlung (Horseshoe Estate), designed by the architect Bruno Taut and built in the late 1920s.

Photograph credit: Alexander Savin


January 18

South Island oystercatcher

The South Island oystercatcher (Haematopus finschi) is one of two common species of oystercatchers found in New Zealand. After breeding inland on the South Island, most of the population moves to estuaries, harbours, beaches and mudflats on the North Island, where the birds largely feed on molluscs and worms. It has piping calls, which are used socially and aggressively, as well as a piercing alarm call and a quiet flight call. This South Island oystercatcher was photographed in Point Chevalier in Auckland.

Photograph credit: John Harrison


January 17

Alva Belmont

Alva Belmont (January 17, 1853 – January 26, 1933) was a prominent multi-millionaire American socialite and a major figure in the women's suffrage movement in the United States. She was noted for her energy, intelligence, strong opinions, and willingness to challenge convention. In 1909, she founded the Political Equality League to get votes for suffrage-supporting New York state politicians, wrote articles for newspapers, and joined the National American Woman Suffrage Association (NAWSA). In 1916, she was one of the founders of the National Woman's Party and organized the first picketing ever to take place before the White House in January 1917; she was elected president of the organization and held the office until her death.

Photograph credit: Bain News Service; restored by Adam Cuerden


January 16

Wrocław Cathedral

Wrocław Cathedral, or the Cathedral of St. John the Baptist, is the seat of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Wrocław and a landmark of the city of Wrocław in Poland. The building, constructed in the Gothic and Neo-Gothic styles, is the fourth church to be built in the location between the 10th and 20th centuries. This photograph of the cathedral's interior shows the choir and sanctuary, looking towards the high altar.

Photograph credit: Diego Delso


January 15

Frances Benjamin Johnston

Frances Benjamin Johnston (January 15, 1864 – May 16, 1952) was an early American photographer and photojournalist whose career lasted for almost half a century. She is most known for her portraits, images of Southern architecture, and various photographic series featuring African Americans and Native Americans at the turn of the 20th century. This 1896 photograph, entitled Self-Portrait (as "New Woman"), depicts Johnston seated in front of a fireplace, holding a cigarette in one hand and a beer stein in the other, in her studio in Washington, D.C.

Photograph credit: Frances Benjamin Johnston; restored by Adam Cuerden

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January 14

Messier 78

Messier 78 (M78) is a reflection nebula in the constellation Orion. It was discovered by French astronomer Pierre Méchain in 1780 and included by Charles Messier in his catalog of comet-like objects that same year. M78 is easily found with a small telescope as a hazy patch and features two stars of tenth and eleventh magnitude, which illuminate the cloud of dust in the nebula and make it visible. This photograph of the nebula was captured by the Wide Field Imager of the MPG/ESO telescope at the European Southern Observatory's La Silla Observatory in Chile.

Photograph credit: Igor Chekalin


January 13

Queen bee

A queen bee is typically an adult, mated female (gyne) that lives in a colony or hive of honey bees. The queen is usually the mother of most, if not all, of the bees in the hive. This close-up photograph shows numerous workers of the East African lowland honey bee surrounding a queen of the European honey bee. The queen bee is marked with a pink dot on the top of its thorax for identification.

Photograph credit: Scott Bauer


January 12

Safety Last! is a 1923 American silent romantic-comedy film starring Harold Lloyd. It includes one of the most famous images from the silent-film era: Lloyd clutching the hands of a large clock as he dangles from the outside of a skyscraper above moving traffic. The film was highly successful and critically hailed, and it cemented Lloyd's status as a major figure in early motion pictures. In 1994, Safety Last! was selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry by the Library of Congress as being "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant". It is one of many works from 1923 that notably entered the public domain in the United States in 2019, the first time any works had done so in 20 years.

Film credit: Fred C. Newmeyer and Sam Taylor


January 11

Oliver Wolcott Jr.

Oliver Wolcott Jr. (January 11, 1760 – June 1, 1833) was the second United States secretary of the treasury under Presidents George Washington and John Adams, a circuit court judge, and the 24th governor of Connecticut. This line engraving of Wolcott was produced around 1902 by the Department of the Treasury's Bureau of Engraving and Printing (BEP) as part of a BEP presentation album of the first 42 secretaries of the treasury.

Engraving credit: Bureau of Engraving and Printing; restored by Andrew Shiva


January 10

Southern rough-winged swallow

The southern rough-winged swallow (Stelgidopteryx ruficollis) is a small member of the swallow family, Hirundinidae. It is native to Central and South America, with some populations being sedentary and others migratory. It occurs in forest clearings and other open areas and nests in holes in walls or banks. This bird, of the subspecies S. r. ruficollis, was photographed in the Pantanal in Brazil.

Photograph credit: Charles James Sharp


January 9

Carrie Chapman Catt

Carrie Chapman Catt (January 9, 1859 – March 9, 1947) was an American women's suffrage leader who campaigned for the Nineteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution, which gave U.S. women the right to vote. One of the best-known women of her time, Catt served as President of the National American Woman Suffrage Association from 1900 to 1904 and again from 1915 to 1920. She founded the International Woman Suffrage Alliance, later named the International Alliance of Women in 1904, and the League of Women Voters in 1920.

Photograph credit: unknown; restored by Adam Cuerden


January 8

POLIN Museum of the History of Polish Jews

The polychrome wooden vault and bimah of the Gwoździec Synagogue, painstakingly reconstructed in 2014, is the centerpiece of the permanent exhibition at the Polin Museum of the History of Polish Jews in Warsaw, Poland. The original synagogue, built in c. 1640 in what is now the Ukrainian town of Hvizdets, was burnt down in 1941 by Nazi German forces.

Photograph credit: Magdalena Starowieyska, Dariusz Golik


January 7

Flag and seal of Illinois

This historical coat of arms of Illinois is an illustration from State Arms of the Union by Henry Mitchell, published by Louis Prang in 1876. It depicts a bald eagle perched on a rock carrying a shield with the stars and stripes. In the eagle's beak there is a banner with the state motto, "State Sovereignty, National Union."

Illustration credit: Henry Mitchell; restored by Andrew Shiva


January 6

Gliophorus chromolimoneus

Gliophorus chromolimoneus is a species of agaric fungus in the family Hygrophoraceae found in New Zealand and Australia. The yellow fruiting bodies are sticky to the touch, and appear among the leaf litter under Nothofagus, Kunzea ericoides and Leptospermum scoparium trees. These two G. chromolimoneus fruiting bodies were photographed in Ferndale Park in New South Wales, Australia.

Photograph credit: John Harrison


January 5

Umberto Eco

Umberto Eco (5 January 1932 – 19 February 2016) was an Italian medievalist, philosopher, semiotician, cultural critic, political and social commentator, and novelist. In English, he is best known for his popular 1980 novel The Name of the Rose, a historical mystery combining semiotics in fiction with biblical analysis, medieval studies, and literary theory, and Foucault's Pendulum, his 1988 novel that touches on similar themes. This photograph of Eco was taken in 1984, during the period of more than thirty years in which he taught at the University of Bologna.

Photograph credit: Rob Bogaerts


January 4

Geastrum triplex

Geastrum triplex is a species of inedible fungus found growing in the detritus and leaf litter of hardwood forests around the world. It is the largest member of the genus Geastrum, the earthstar fungi, and expanded mature specimens can reach a tip-to-tip length of up to 12 centimetres (4.7 in). This G. triplex fruiting body was photographed in the Royal National Park in New South Wales, Australia.

Photograph credit: John Harrison


January 3

Thin section

In optical mineralogy and petrography, a thin section is a thin slice of a rock, mineral, soil, pottery, bones, or even metal sample, prepared in a laboratory, for use with a polarizing petrographic microscope, electron microscope and electron microprobe. A thin sliver of rock is cut from the sample with a diamond saw and ground optically flat. It is then mounted on a glass slide and then ground smooth using progressively finer abrasive grit until the sample is only 30 micrometres (0.0012 in) thick. This image shows a thin section of Siilinjärvi apatite ore from Finland in cross-polarized transmitted light; the specimen depicted here is approximately 36.6 mm (1.44 in) wide by 20 mm (0.79 in) high.

Photograph credit: Kallerna


January 2

Turkey vulture

The turkey vulture (Cathartes aura) is the most widespread of the New World vultures, with a range extending from southern Canada to the southernmost tip of South America. It feeds primarily on a wide variety of carrion, from small mammals to large herbivores, preferring those recently dead to putrefying carcasses; it rarely kills prey itself. Populations appear to be stable, and it is listed as a least-concern species by the International Union for Conservation of Nature. This photograph shows a turkey vulture in flight in Cuba. It employs static soaring flight, in which it flaps its wings infrequently, and takes advantage of rising thermals to stay aloft.

Photograph credit: Charles James Sharp


January 1

Euro sign

The euro sign (€) is the currency symbol used for the euro, the official currency of the eurozone and a few other European countries. The design was presented to the public by the European Commission on 12 December 1996, and consists of a stylized letter E (or epsilon) crossed by two lines instead of one. While the Commission intended the euro sign to be a prescribed glyph, type designers made it clear that they intended instead to adapt the design to be consistent with the typefaces to which the symbol was to be added. Euro banknotes and coins entered into circulation on 1 January 2002, making it the day-to-day operating currency of its original members. This diagram shows the construction of the euro sign as formally specified by the European Commission.

Diagram credit: Erina


December 31

The Tales of Hoffmann

The Tales of Hoffmann is an opéra fantastique by the French composer Jacques Offenbach. The French libretto was written by Jules Barbier, based on three short stories by E. T. A. Hoffmann, the opera's protagonist. It was Offenbach's final work; he died in October 1880, four months before it premiered in Paris. This illustration of the opera's premiere, attributed to Pierre-Auguste Lamy, depicts the Olympia act, based on a portion of Hoffmann's "Der Sandmann".

Illustration credit: Pierre-Auguste Lamy (attributed); restored by Adam Cuerden


December 30

Grass snake

The grass snake (Natrix natrix) is a Eurasian non-venomous colubrid snake that grows to around a metre (3 ft) in length. It is often found near water and feeds almost exclusively on amphibians. Its prey, often common frogs or toads, is caught and swallowed whole. While digesting a large meal, the snake does not travel far, preferring to bask in the sun. Two or three significant food items may supply an individual's needs for the whole season, with the snake finding an underground refuge, not subject to freezing, in which to overwinter. This grass snake was photographed near Storkow in Brandenburg, Germany.

Photograph credit: Andreas Eichler


December 29

Charles Gravier, comte de Vergennes

Charles Gravier, comte de Vergennes (29 December 1719 – 13 February 1787), was a French statesman and diplomat. He served as the French foreign minister from 1774 during the reign of Louis XVI, notably during the American Revolutionary War. This oil-on-canvas portrait, by the French painter Antoine de Favray, depicts Vergennes in Turkish attire as ambassador to the Ottoman Empire. The painting is in the collection of the Pera Museum in Istanbul.

Painting credit: Antoine de Favray


December 28

Wat Phra Si Rattana Mahathat

Wat Phra Si Rattana Mahathat (Temple of the Great Jewelled Reliquary), colloquially referred to as Wat Phra Si or Wat Yai, is a Buddhist temple (wat) in Phitsanulok Province, Thailand. It is located on the east bank of the Nan River, near Naresuan Bridge. The temple is famous for its gilded statue of the Buddha, shown in this photograph. The statue is considered to be one of the most beautiful and classically magnificent figures of the Buddha in Thailand, and worthy of the highest respect among the Thai people.

Photograph credit: Supanut Arunoprayote


December 27

South-western black rhinoceros

The south-western black rhinoceros (Diceros bicornis occidentalis) is a subspecies of the black rhinoceros found primarily in Namibia. The chief threat it faces is from illegal poaching for its valuable horn. It is listed as near threatened by the International Union for Conservation of Nature. The total population is increasing, and numbered 1,920 animals in 2010. This female south-western black rhinoceros was photographed in Etosha National Park, Namibia.

Photograph credit: Charles James Sharp


December 26

Santo Stanislao dei Polacchi

Santo Stanislao dei Polacchi is a Catholic church in Rome, Italy, situated on Via delle Botteghe Oscure in the rione of Sant'Angelo. It is the national church of Poland in Rome and is dedicated to Saint Stanislaus of Szczepanów. The ceiling of its single nave is decorated with this painting by Ermenegildo Costantini, entitled The Glory of Saint Stanislaus.

Painting credit: Ermenegildo Costantini; photographed by Livioandronico


December 25

Melun Diptych

The Melun Diptych is a two-panel oil painting by the French court painter Jean Fouquet (c. 1420–1481) created around 1452. The name of the diptych came from its original home in the Collegiate Church of Notre-Dame in Melun. The left panel depicts Étienne Chevalier with his patron saint Saint Stephen and the right panel, seen here, depicts the Virgin and Christ child. The Madonna wears a blue dress, white mantle and a jewel-encrusted crown. On her lap sits the Christ child, who is making a pointing gesture at the patron and the saint. The two are surrounded by blue and red cherubim, which greatly contrast with the pale skin of the Virgin and Christ child.

Painting credit: Jean Fouquet


December 24

Jenny Nyström

Jenny Nyström (1854–1946) was a Swedish painter and illustrator who is mainly known as the creator of the image of the jultomte used on numerous Christmas cards and magazine covers, thus linking the Swedish version of Santa Claus to the gnomes and tomtar of Scandinavian folklore. This illustration for a Christmas card, depicting three jultomte working, was painted by Nyström around 1899.

Illustration credit: Jenny Nyström, restored by Adam Cuerden


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